Radiometric dating correct

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As a precautionary measure, a piece twice as big as the one required by the protocol was cut from the Shroud; it measured 81 mm × 21 mm (3.19 in × 0.83 in).An outer strip showing coloured filaments of uncertain origin was discarded.that radio-carbon testing dated the shroud to a date of 1260-1390 CE, with 95% confidence.The official and complete report on the experiment was published in Nature.The remaining sample, measuring 81 mm × 16 mm (3.19 in × 0.63 in) and weighing 300 mg, was first divided in two equal parts, one of which was preserved in a sealed container, in the custody of the Vatican, in case of future need.The other half was cut into three segments, and packaged for the labs in a separate room by Dr Tite and the archbishop.It is hypothesised that the sampled area was a medieval repair which was conducted by "invisible reweaving".

Gove consulted numerous laboratories which were able at the time (1982) to carbon-date small fabric samples. [...] The pressure on the ecclesiastic authorities to accept the Turin protocol have almost approached illegality. The blind-test method was abandoned, because the distinctive three-to-one herringbone twill weave of the shroud could not be matched in the controls, and it was therefore still possible for a laboratory to identify the shroud sample. group expected to perform the radiometric examination under its own aegis and after the other examinations had been completed, while the laboratories considered radio-carbon dating to be the prime test, which should be completed at the detriment of other tests, if necessary.On 12 December 2003, Rogers received samples of both warp and weft threads that Prof.Luigi Gonella claimed to have taken from the radiocarbon sample before it was distributed for dating.

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